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Speech & Language Therapy

Preschool Speech/Language Services

Berkeley County Schools provides speech/language services to children ages 3-5 prior to entering Kindergarten. If your child is enrolled in a Berkeley County Preschool Program contact your child’s teacher with your concerns. If you are concerned about your child’s speech development and they are not enrolled in a Berkeley County Preschool Program contact the speech-language pathologist in that building according to the chart below.

  • If your child will attend Kindergarten at the following elementary schools then contact the speech-language pathologist at Bedington Elementary School.
    • Marlowe
    • Hedgesville Elementary
    • Bedington Elementary
    • Spring Mills Primary
  • If your child will attend Kindergarten at the following elementary schools then contact the speech-language pathologist at Tuscarora Elementary School.
    • Burke Street
    • Winchester Ave.
    • Tuscarora
    • Opequon
    • Berkeley Heights
    • Rosemont
  • If your child will attend Kindergarten at the following elementary schools then contact the speech-language pathologist at Valley View Elementary School.
    • Back Creek Valley
    • Gerrardstown
    • Valley View
    • Bunker Hill
    • Inwood Primary

Speech/Language Services for School Age Students

If you are concerned about your child’s speech/language skills contact the speech-language pathologist at your child’s school.

Criteria for Meeting Eligibility for Speech/Language Services (WV Policy 2419)

Definition: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) defines a speech or language impairment as a communication disorder, such as stuttering, impaired articulation, a language impairment, or a voice impairment that adversely affects a child's educational performance. (See Appendix for Documentation of Adverse Effects on Educational Performance for Students with Speech-Language Impairments) Communication disorders are also defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Addition (DSM-5) as follows:

  • Language includes the form, function and use of a conventional system of symbols (i.e., spoken words, sign language, written words, pictures) in a rule-governed manner for communication.
  • Speech is the expressive production of sounds and includes an individual’s articulation, fluency, voice and resonance quality.
  • Communication includes any verbal or nonverbal behavior that influences the behavior, ideas or attitude of another individual.
  • Assessments of speech-language and communication abilities must take into account the individuals cultural and language context, particularly for individuals growing up in bilingual environments.
  • Standardized measures of language development and of nonverbal intellectual capacity must be relevant for the cultural and linguistic group (i.e., tests developed and standardized for one group may not provide appropriate norms for a different group.)

LANGUAGE DISORDER–Documentation which meets the following:

  • Two or more procedures, at least one of which yields a standard score, were used to assess both expressive and receptive modalities.
  • K-12 - Language abilities are substantially and quantifiably below those expected for the student’s chronological age and cognitive state of development, resulting in functional limitation in, social participation, academic achievement or occupational performance, individually or in any combination.
  • PRESCHOOL: Language abilities had a negative impact on social-communicative interaction.
    • Norm referenced language tests were administered which yield two subtest or total test scores with the following characteristics:
      • 5 or more standard deviations (SD) below the mean;
      • a language quotient/standard score of 78 (mean of 100);
      • a stanine of two and/or a percentile of 8; and/or
      • non-standardized/informal assessment indicates that the student has difficulty understanding and/or expressing ideas and/or concepts to such a degree that it interferes with the student’s social/educational progress

SPEECH SOUND DISORDER-Documentation which meets the following:

  • At least two procedures were used to assess the student, one of which is a standardized measure.
  • Application of developmental norms from diagnostic tests verifies that speech sounds may not develop without intervention.
  • K-12:The student’s speech has a negative impact on academic, social and/or vocational functioning and one of the following characteristics exists:
    • Two or more phonemic errors not expected at the student’s current age or developmental level were observed during direct testing and/or conversational speech; or
    • Two or more phonological processes not expected at the student’s current age or developmental level were observed during direct testing and/or in conversational speech.
  • PRESCHOOL: The student’s speech has a negative impact on social-communicative interactions and one of the following characteristics:
    • Multiple phonemic errors that significantly reduce the student’s speech intelligibility and are not expected at the student’s current age or developmental level were observed during direct testing and/or conversational speech.
    • Two or more phonological processes that significantly reduce the student’s speech intelligibility and are not expected at the student’s current age or developmental level were observed during direct testing and/or in conversational speech.

CHILDHOOD-ONSET FLUENCY DISORDER (STUTTERING)-Documentation which meets the following:

  • The student had a fluency rating of moderate or severe on the Suggested Guidelines for Stuttering Services or Suggested Guidelines for Stuttering Services for Preschool.

SOCIAL (PRAGMATIC) COMMUNICATION DISORDER–Documentation which meets the following:

  • Assessment measures included norm referenced tests, multiple observations, checklists and structured tasks.
  • Assessment procedures were used that are contextually based and involved multiple settings and communication partners.
  • Assessment results indicate deficits in functional limitations in effective communication, social participation, social relationships, academic achievement and/or occupational performance, individually or in combination.
  • Assessment results have eliminated the presence of restricted repetitive behaviors, interests and other activities related to the diagnosis of Autism.

VOICE DISORDER–Documentation which meets the following:

  • The student has a voice production rating of moderate or severe on the Voice Rating Scale.
  • The existence or absence of a structural or functional pathology has been verified by an otolaryngologist.

 

Speech and Language Therapy Staff

Lead SLP - Melanie Place, MS, CCC-SLP

Deanna Basile, MS, CCC-SLP
Kristin Bennett, MS, CCC-SLP
Cheryl Cain, MS, CCC-SLP
Jennette Cosola, MA, CCC-SLP
Irene Cunningham, BS, SLPA
Susan Dixon, MS, CCC-SLP
Michaela Hartofelis, BS, SLPA
Jamie Jones, MS, CCC-SLP
Hannah Neely, BS, SLPA
Sara Martin, MS, CCC-SLP
Ryan Kerns, BS, SLPA
Misty Merkel, MS, CCC-SLP
Rebecca Mills, MA, CCC-SLP
Mary Niggemyer, MS, CCC-SLP
Trisha Palmer, MS, CCC-SLP
Vicki Shade, MS, CCC-SLP
Meredith Shelton, BS, SLPA
Michelle Stickel, MS, CFY-SLP
Emylee Yudasz, MA, CCC-SLP
Chelsea Taylor, BS, SLPA
Beth Young, BS, SLP

Mary Ellen Becker, MS, SLP
Rachel Burkhart, MS, CFY-SLP
Diana Clemmons, MS, CCC-SLP
Mary Cummings-Smith, MS, CCC-SLP
Jillian Darby, MS, CCC-SLP
Kelsey Blaine, MS, CCC-SLP
Ashley Jenkins, MA, CCC-SLP
Laura Kaiser, MS, CCC-SLP
Nora Markland, MA, CCC-SLP
Clarissa Mason, MA, CFY-SLP
Lynelle McFarland, MS, CCC-SLP
Melissa Michael, MS, CCC-SLP
Theresa Morrison, MS, CCC-SLP
Lynn Olsen, MS, CCC-SLP
Lisa Price, MS, CCC-SLP
Cameron Shelton, BS, SLPA
Melinda Sherman, MS, CCC-SLP
Jessica McDonald, BS, SLPA
Linda Soos, MA, CCC-SLP
Kasey Wiggington, BA, SLPA